Tunney's Pasture

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Tunney's Pasture is the current western terminus of the Confederation Line, until 2025 when the line is extended further west as part of Stage 2. This station serves the expansive Tunney's Pasture federal government complex, the neighbourhoods of Hintonburg, Wellington West and Mechanics Ville. This station is also among the busiest on the Confederation Line due to its current role as a terminus for passengers heading to and from the south and west.

The station is located at the corner of Scott and Holland Avenues in Ottawa. Entrances to the station are located along Scott Street near Holland, with a second entrance just North of Scott along Tunney's Pasture Driveway. A third entrance is located at the northwestern corner of the bus loop to allow nearby workers of Tunney's Pasture an additional entrance into the station.

As the station is the western terminus of the Confederation Line, the accompanying bus loop located outside is very large in scale and able to accommodate all westbound bus routes arriving and departing from Tunney's Pasture to destinations such as Kanata, Nepean, Barrhaven, and more.

The station's design and layout are entirely within the fare paid zone, meaning that access inside of the station and to the bus loop outside requires passage through fare gates. Passengers taking a bus do not need to pay or tap their Presto card when boarding as they are already within the fare paid zone.

The main concourse is very spacious and open-air. The western end of the concourse will see the arrival of Happy Goat Coffee shop in early 2020, one of four stations to receive a retail outlet.

The artwork in this station features a massive stained glass skylight element, which casts coloured light patterns across the floor throughout the day. On the stairs as well as on the platform level, more artwork in the form of a mosaic wall mural is on display, made up of glass tiles. Overall, these elements combine to create a very colourful environment in such a busy station.

UNIQUE FEATURES

Tunney's Pasture is one of four stations to receive a retail outlet within the station concourse. The Happy Goat Coffee shop will serve coffee, drinks and local foods to passengers.

The stunning station artwork creates an ever-changing ambience throughout the day as the sunlight shifts from east to west, casting colourful light rays onto the concourse floor.

Being one of the three main bus transfer stations on the Confederation Line, the bus loop is extremely large in scale and serves over 50 bus routes.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: Gradient Space

Artist: Derek Root (Vancouver, BC)

Gradient Space consists of two large-scale glass mosaic wall murals on each side of the platform and one skylight element on the roof of the station.

Derek Root's idea for the Tunney's Station artwork takes its inspiration from the phenomenon of light refraction. The title of the artwork, Gradient Space, refers to the effect of colour gradation that sometimes appears when light passes and refracts through a form made of glass. The artist imagined the transit passengers as being analogous to light. Like particles of light, each passenger travels toward and through the glass station, ultimately dispersing to their respective destinations.

Glass is the principal material for the two-part integrated design. The mosaic wall mural is constructed using vibrant glass tile. The skylight design incorporates brightly saturated panes of laminated glass similar in layout to the wall mosaic. The composition employs vertical bands of colour gradients that are overlapped by diagonal bands of colour gradients. The gradation of angled tones gives a sense of movement and energy to the transit space.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Bayview (1110 metres)

 STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 580,000
  • Weekday Average: 24,000
  • Weekend Average: 8,400
Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. It is important to note that the figures above for Tunney's Pasture Station will also capture customers who are using the station to access bus service.
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Bayview

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Bayview Station is the O-Train network's only transfer station between Lines 1 and 2, which makes it of strategic importance. Bayview Station is located on the western end of LeBreton Flats, an area that is slated for significant redevelopment in the coming years, with access from Albert Street, as well as the multi-use pathways that surround the station.

The station's design has Confederation Line (Line 1) running above the Trillium Line (Line 2), on an elevated guideway and platforms. The Trillium Line operates from the lower single platform as its northernmost terminus. Transferring between both lines is an easy matter, with the use of stairs, escalators or elevators, positioned in the central portion of the station. With lots of train movements and activity at Bayview, as well as excellent sightlines and views of the trains from above and below, and from the nearby pathways, it is quite popular for railfans and transit enthusiasts alike.

The eastern end of the Confederation Line platforms grants passengers views of the nearby Ottawa downtown skyline, which come sunset is quite stunning to see.

This station is popular for passengers transferring to Line 2 heading towards South Keys in the Southern end of Ottawa. Of course, the biggest usage of Bayview Station comes from students heading towards Carleton University, who are transferring between the lines.

It is important to note that this is the second version of Bayview Station. When the station originally opened on October 15, 2001, it was located in the same position, with the bus rapid transit (Transitway) roadway passing above, in the same location as the Confederation Line does today. The Trillium Line was accessed by long paved pathways that looped down from the Transitway overpass to the train platform below. When construction started for the new station, the old station was demolished, along with the Transitway overpass. The station was then relocated to a temporary location about 150 metres south of its former location. A few weeks before the opening of the Confederation Line, the lower platform at the new Bayview Station reopened to serve the new platform for the Trillium Line. Then on September 14, 2019, the entire station opened and service began on the Confederation Line, giving a much improved, easier and safer connection to the Trillium Line.

UNIQUE FEATURES

Obviously, the most unique feature at Bayview is the connection between Lines 1 & 2. With easy access between both lines via stairs, escalators and elevators, the intersection of both the Confederation Line and Trillium Line shines at Bayview as the only rail transfer station on the network.

This station can also be popular for seeing the sunrise or sunset as the view towards downtown Ottawa and the skyline is quite impressive and mostly unimpeded, due to the station being elevated and on a small hill.

Bayview is also unique west of downtown for giving easy access to the Ottawa River Pathway for walkers, joggers or cyclists.

With plenty of windows and areas to get close and personal with the trains, observing train movements is easy at Bayview, whether you are wishing to spot Confederation Line trains above, or Trillium Line trains below.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: As the Crow Flies

Artist: Adrian Göllner (Ottawa, ON)

As the Crow Flies is a 120-metre line drawing that traces alongside the train as it moves in and out of the station. Combining the rooflines of local architecture, a silhouette of the Gatineau Hills and the flight pattern of a crow into a single optical flow, the artwork serves to remind passengers of the history of the area and our ongoing relationship with nature. The artwork serves as an inter-track barrier through the full length of the station interior and is fabricated from tubular steel and fencing elements.

The rooflines of houses within the artwork are specific to Mechanicsville, the neighbourhood immediately to the west of the station, so named for the mechanics who lived there and serviced the freight trains that pulled in and out of the train yards at this location. Also included are the distinct outlines of the Canadian War Museum, the Supreme Court Building, the Lemieux Island Water Purification Plant and the Terrasses de la Chaudière Complex on the Gatineau side of the Ottawa River.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

Title: Cascades

Artist: Pierre Poussin (Toronto, ON)

Cascades are laser-cut aluminum sculptures that draw from the rich historical context of the Chaudière Falls, located next to Bayview Station. Chaudière Falls is one of the earliest sites of human occupation in this country, holding great significance as an indigenous spiritual, cultural, and trading hub. Cascades celebrates this past and roots the future of Bayview Station's transformation into a modern hub of spiritual, cultural and economic activity. The sculptures incorporate public seating while remaining rooted in history and nature, expressed through their curved lines and juxtaposition against the linear and industrial station – an act of reclaiming nature in our urban setting.

Visually, Cascades seems to water the land around Bayview station in a symbolic gesture of new communities growing in the area. Cascades also creates a playful dynamic of lines and curves, while speaking to nature and sustainability. It reminds us that no matter our technological and industrial tendencies, we must respect and prioritize our land and water.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019 (Original Station October 15, 2001).
  • Lines: Confederation & Trillium Lines
  • Previous Station: 
    • Pimisi (730 metres) - (Confederation Line)
  • Following Stations:
    • Tunney's Pasture (1110 metres) - (Confederation Line)
    • Dow's Lake (1575 metres) - (Trillium Line)

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 412,000
  • Weekday Average: 8,500
  • Weekend Average: 3,000

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. O-Train Line 2 ridership is based on Automatic Passenger Counters aboard O-Train Line 2 trains.


Line 2 (Trillium Line) at Bayview Station is currently closed and in the process of being expanded for the Line 2 South Extension, which will see longer trains and double platforms. Below are some concept renders of the expanded Bayview Station (Line 2), scheduled to open in 2022.

Bayview Station is an existing transfer station on the Confederation Line and also serves as the northern terminus station of the Trillium Line. The existing single-track Trillium Line station platform located on the lower level will remain in place and be extended to accommodate the new longer Trillium Line trains. A second track and platform will be provided on the east side of the alignment to allow the station to operate as a two-track station, creating enhanced operational flexibility.

The two platforms will be connected by a partially enclosed walkway to allow customers access to each platform from the station entrance to the Confederation Line without being completely exposed to the elements.

A new fare-controlled entrance and plaza will be provided at the southern end of the western train platform extension. Located adjacent to the new entry, outside of the fare paid zone, a vertical circulation core consisting of two elevators and stairs will serve a new fully enclosed pedestrian bridge providing the public with a safe, direct, and weather protected connection across the Trillium Line corridor connecting to the adjacent development on Albert Street.

Trinity Developments Inc. has agreed to fund this pedestrian bridge link from their future development at 900 Albert St., which will be implemented through the Stage 2 project.

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Pimisi

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Pimisi Station is located in LeBreton Flats, specifically underneath the Booth Street Bridge. This station serves as a major transfer point to Gatineau as well as for big events in the region, such as Bluesfest, in addition to the Canadian War Museum located nearby.

This area of the city is poised to undergo significant redevelopment in the coming years and as a result, the station was built to accommodate this future growth.

Pimisi Station's design and many public art pieces showcase the Algonquin culture and reflect on the historical and contemporary cultural significance of the Algonquin people.

The station design features a centre platform, allowing easy access to trains heading in both directions. Entrances are located on both sides of the Booth Street Bridge, with an additional entrance located underneath the station, allowing access to the multi-use pathway and the Pimisi plaza. Additionally, stairs and an elevator provide access from the plaza to the Booth Street Bridge, without the need for passing through the station or the fare gates.

From the eastern entrance on the Booth Street Bridge, expansive glass windows afford passengers a clear view of train movements through the western tunnel portal entrance.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The station's unique design, thanks in part to its entrances above and below the station, allows passengers to both pass over and underneath the guideway, a unique design characteristic that is only shared with Bayview.

The artwork integrated and on display at the station is both stunning and extensive. From the Algonquin Canoe hanging over the platform level to the Pimisi (Eel) in the plaza area, and more, the Algonquin influence and culture are clearly reflected and respected at this station. While the station is located in the city, the plaza promotes calmness in an otherwise busy and bustling region of the city. With plenty of benches and places to sit, rest and relax, Pimisi Station stands out with stunning design, architecture, artwork and landscaping.

The platform level of the station is also unique in that the design is not symmetrical between the eastbound and westbound platforms. The eastbound platform is capped by tinted glazed panels (Birch forest fence), while the westbound platform is enclosed by a slanted wall with vertical glass slits that look out towards the plaza.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Each of the integrated artistic elements at Pimisi Station pays homage to the Algonquin relationship to the land – specifically to the eel, the birch and the ash tree. The intent of artist Nadia Myre has been to both celebrate Algonquin culture and to remind visitors of the fragile ecosystem we inhabit.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

Title: untitled (Pimisi/Eel)

Artist: Nadia Myre (Montreal, QC)

The eel is sacred to the Algonquin people and has been an essential part of their culture for thousands of years. It is a source of spirituality, medicine and nutrition. To mark that significance, an 8-metre-tall chromed eel is being created as a beacon and a landmark at the station. Standing vertically in the aqueduct next to the station, the eel will be installed with its head diving into a fissure between rocks, its surface reflecting and disappearing into its surroundings.

Title: untitled (Woven basket)

Artist: Nadia Myre (Montreal, QC)

Facing the north entrance on the lower level plaza, a three-metre sculpture of a split-ash woven basket will serve as a welcome area for visitors. Because the basket signifies trade, shared knowledge and abundance, it will be an apt symbol for the space, designed as a meeting place.

Title: untitled (Birch forest fence)

Artist: Nadia Myre (Montreal, QC)

The row of birch trees windscreen replaces the location of a planned snow fence, running parallel along the east and west side of the train platform and will be fabricated out of tinted glazed panels.

Title: Algonquin Canoe

Lead artist: Simon Brascoupé (Ottawa, ON)

Artist: Emily Brascoupé-Hoefler (Ottawa, ON)

Artist: Sherry-Ann Rodgers (Gatineau, QC)

Artist: Doreen Stevens (Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, QC)

Artist: Sylvia Tennisco (Pikwàkanagàn, ON)

Occupying a place of prominence in the station's concourse the installation Algonquin Canoe Paddle features 100 paddles, each hand-painted by Algonquin Anishinabe artists and arranged in the shape of a canoe. The piece is inspired by the Algonquin teaching that it takes many people to paddle a canoe.

While the artists involved were of all ages – youth, adults and elders alike – the project was led by internationally known Algonquin artist Simon Brascoupé. Brascoupé mentored four Algonquin Anishinabe artists – Emily Brascoupé-Hoefler, Doreen Stevens, Sherry-Ann Rodgers and Sylvia Tennisco – who in turn conducted paddle-making and painting workshops in Algonquin communities throughout the region. The paddles created through that process were featured at art exhibits both in Algonquin communities and in Ottawa before being installed at Pimisi Station.

Title: Algonquin Moose

Artist: Simon Brascoupé (Ottawa, ON)

Brascoupé's sculpture of a moose is installed at the west end of the Pimisi plaza. Measuring 3.7 metres in height, the sculpture is big enough for passengers, pedestrians and motorists alike to enjoy. The sculpture, which faces the rising sun, is red to represent fall colours and life.

Title: Algonquin Birch Bark Biting Window Art

Artists: Simon Brascoupé, Claire Brascoupé and Mairi Brascoupé

Pimisi Station also features designs inspired by the ancient art of Algonquin birch bark biting. This process traditionally involves using the teeth to create intricate designs on pieces of birch bark. Designs created by Brascoupé and other artists are applied to the station's glass windows. They represent Algonquin teachings such as the sacredness of all things, relationships and seasonal cycles.

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Lyon (840 metres)
  • Following Station: Bayview (730 metres)

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 89,000
  • Weekday Average: 3,600
  • Weekend Average: 1,400

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. 

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Lyon

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Lyon Station is one of three downtown underground stations along the Confederation Line.

As this station is located underground, station entrances are integrated into several surrounding buildings. Place de Ville has direct access via its underground concourse level, with an additional entrance from the exterior of the Podium Building, along Queen Street. A second entrance is located at the corner of Queen and Lyon Streets. This entrance is currently a standalone entrance, but a new real-estate development, the Claridge Moon project, will rise and integrate above this entrance building over the coming years.

The station's layout is such that the two entrances do not link at the concourse level without having to pass through the fare gates.

The main concourse is quite impressive, the space is vast, open and airy and passengers can easily pass through this important area of the station easily at all times of the day.

At the platform level, located 18.5 metres below ground, the main colour is yellow, reflected in the accents on the walls.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The most unique feature of this station is the large open and bright space of the concourse that just feels massive in size.

Another interesting feature is the connection to Place de Ville. This building complex comprises 4 office buildings, a food court, as well as 2 hotels, all linked by an underground concourse, spread over two full city blocks.

The artwork in this station, specifically "This Images Replies on Positive Thinking" is also quite expansive and omnipresent throughout the entrances and hallways to reach the concourse. And on the concourse level, the central art piece "With Words as their Actions", encourages passengers to slow down to read and discover some history of Bytown and Ottawa.

In the near future, this station will also be a key link between Ottawa's OC Transpo transit network and Gatineau's STO bus lines, with most of the Gatineau bus routes connecting through this station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: With Words as their Actions

Artist: PLANT Architect (Toronto, ON)

With Words as their Actions, celebrates women as keepers of history – and in particular, the 32 women who, in 1898, founded the Ottawa chapter of the Women's Canadian Historical Society (now the Historical Society of Ottawa). In 1954, Anne Dewar, a member of the society, presented The Last Days of Bytown, a lively documentation of life in the community a century earlier, when it was on the verge of changing its name from Bytown to Ottawa and becoming Canada's capital. With Words as their Actions features Dewar's 5,000-word text laser-cut into a curving, stainless steel curtain. Lines of text cut through on one side in English interweave with the French translation cut through on the other side, recalling the intricacy of hand embroidery and other fibre arts traditionally considered 'women's work'. Instead of reading this lacy curtain of words all at once, passengers can absorb a bit of it each time they pass through the station. The turned-out letters that add texture to the artwork also act as bookmarks, making it easy to 'pick up where you left off'. Silhouettes of the society's founders gathered in conversation preside over the curtain, passing knowledge to each other and to the viewer.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

Title: This Image Relies On Positive Thinking

Artist: Geoff McFetridge (Calgary, AB)

For this integrated piece, Artist Geoff McFetridge uses human figures as graphic elements to reflect on his impressions of contemporary life. Nearly typographic in their simplicity, the figures speak to the "house of cards" nature of living in a city. The people he portrays are both noise makers and noise complainers. His people are equal collaborators in the pyramid scheme with no end that is life in the city. Geoff McFetridge aims at creating a visual community by promoting ideas of unity and collaboration. With no distinctive characteristics or defining features, his figures are meant to portray a familiar and universal symbol of humankind that celebrates equality.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Parliament (400 metres)
  • Following Station: Pimisi (840 metres)
  • Platform Depth: 18.5 metres below ground

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 275,000
  • Weekday Average: 12,100
  • Weekend Average: 2,300

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. 

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Parliament

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Parliament Station is one of three downtown underground stations along the Confederation Line. This station experiences a high volume of passengers on the O-Train network due to its proximity to many federal government departments and its location in the core downtown business district.

As this station is located underground, station entrances are integrated into several surrounding buildings. The Sun Life Financial Centre has direct access via its atrium into the station, with an additional external entrance located on Queen Street. A second entrance is situated at the corner of Queen and O'Connor Streets, on the facade of 155 Queen (Heritage Place). This entrance also connects to the Winners retailer, offering the store a second entrance to its existing main entrance on Sparks Street, as well as serving as an unofficial entrance to the station. A third standalone entrance, offering accessible access via twin elevators directly to the underground concourse is also available at the corner of Queen and O'Connor.

The station's layout allows the possibility to walk from one set of entrances to another, without passing through the fare gates to do so.

The main concourse is quite impressive, with the stunning multicoloured artwork on the ceiling stretching across the ceiling, to the subdued lighting present throughout. The space is vast and passengers can easily pass through this important area of the station easily at all times of the day. 

At the platform level, located 19 metres below ground, the main colour is green, reflected in the accents on the walls, as well as the artwork separating the guideway in two.

Overall, Parliament Station is one of the true highlights of the Confederation Line, with its eye-catching artwork, connectivity to adjacent buildings, and station design and layout.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The unique artwork present in the concourse and the platform levels are extremely eye-catching and at the same time relaxing to see, a unique trait to have for such a busy station. The concourse allows passage to all entrances without needing to pass through a fare gate, a feature which is unique to Parliament in the downtown underground stations. Parliament is also the first O-Train station to have an entrance to a store (Winners) integrated into one of its entrance passageways.

Another interesting feature or "secret" of Parliament Station is the mysterious Level M. While the public is not able to visit Level M, it can be briefly seen while riding the elevators between street level at Queen and O'Connor to the underground concourse. The purpose and contents of Level M remain for the time being... a mystery.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: Lone Pine Sunset

Artist: Douglas Coupland (Vancouver, BC)

Lone Pine Sunset, reinterprets Tom Thomson's seminal painting The Jack Pine, through its use of colour and formal geometry. The iconic painting is converted into geometric forms which hover beneath the station's ceiling. The space is imbued with the rich, distinctive colourization that was a trademark of both Thomson's work and the Group of Seven in general.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

Title: Trails: home and away

Artist: Jennifer Stead (Florenceville-Bristol, NB)

Trails: home and away is a series of 11 laser-cut painted steel panels, nine feet tall by 20 feet long, depicting the small, low-growing plants that line the paths and trails across Canada. Each panel design describes plants specific to one of the many ecological zones of the country, starting toward the west end of the platform at Parliament Station with the Pacific Maritime and progressing through the Mountain, Arctic, Boreal and Prairie to the Atlantic.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Rideau (725 metres)
  • Following Station: Lyon (400 metres)
  • Platform Depth: 19 metres below ground

 STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 381,000
  • Weekday Average: 16,700
  • Weekend Average: 3,400

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations.

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Rideau

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Rideau Station is one of the three downtown underground stations along the Confederation Line. This station is the deepest in the O-Train network with the platforms reaching 26.5 metres below ground, a necessity to allow the tunnel to pass underneath the nearby Rideau Canal. This station is the second busiest on the O-Train network due to its proximity to many tourist attractions, its connection to the CF Rideau Centre shopping mall and its location at the gateway to the Byward Market.

As this station is located underground, station entrances are integrated into several surrounding buildings. The CF Rideau Centre features most of the entrances, available inside and outside of the shopping mall. One entrance is located on the exterior facade of the building at the corner of Sussex and Rideau Streets. Two other entrances are located within the CF Rideau Centre, one on Level 1 between Shoppers Drug Mart and Farmboy, and the second next to EBX and across from Tim Hortons, which is an accessible entrance via elevators to the concourse. The final entrance is located across the street at the corner of Rideau and William Streets and is integrated into the ground floor of a Scotiabank branch.

The station's layout is such that the two entrances do not link at the concourse level without having to pass through the fare gates.

The main concourse as well as the station platforms are very impressive due to the soaring ceiling in the central section of the station's volume. This allows visitors the opportunity to watch arriving and departing trains from above and view the flow of passengers from a distance.

At the platform level, located 26.5 metres below ground, the main colour is blue, reflected in the accents on the walls at either end.

Overall, Rideau Station is one of the true highlights of the Confederation Line, with its large sight lines affording views of train movements, as well as the station's design and architecture, in addition to the public art exhibit corridor and the busker position on the concourse.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The most unique feature of Rideau Station is its depth, with the platforms reaching 26.5 metres below Rideau Street. Thanks in part to its extreme depth, Rideau Station features the "Longest Escalator" in a Canadian transit system. It is approximately 35.3 metres long and rises 15.8 metres, with 181 steps. This escalator can be accessed by either the CF Rideau Centre or the Sussex and Rideau entrances. The second entrance at Rideau and William Streets in the Byward Market features 4 shorter escalators to reach the station's concourse. The depth is due to the need for the tunnel to pass underneath the Rideau Canal.

Another interesting feature of Rideau Station is that it also contains the most elevators and escalators in the O-Train network, with a total of 18 escalators and 8 elevators.

Corridor 45 | 75 is located between the "Longest Escalator" and the concourse fare gates. This area is known as Ottawa's Underground Art Space and stretches 25 metres in length. It is one of three professional galleries managed by the City of Ottawa Public Art Program, with the goal of offering a space for the exploration of diverse ideas. The initial exhibit is a display of all of the public art visible in the 13 initial Confederation Line stations (from Blair to Tunney's Pasture).

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: FLOW / FLOTS

Artist: Geneviève Cadieux (Montreal, QC)

The artist explains her integrated art piece as follows: "In conceiving my design for the project, I have drawn inspiration from the representation of landscape in the history of Canadian art, and from Glenn Gould's conceptual affinity for the Canadian North as expressed in "The Idea of North," a sound documentary made for CBC radio in 1967. The notion of the North, which has become a metaphor in the Canadian consciousness, is a symbolic location of the sublime.

Through its allegorical conjuring of the immensity and beauty of Canadian nordicity, FLOW / FLOTS pursues and prolongs this line of cultural thinking. FLOW / FLOTS also evokes the significance of the Rideau Canal and its vicinity to the Rideau Station, as well as the importance of water in Canada's history, rooted both in the vast area of our land that it covers and in the complex network of lakes and rivers that it forms, an inestimable wealth.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

Title: The shape this takes to get to that

Artist: Jim Verburg (Toronto, ON)

The artist explains his integrated art piece as follows: "Inspired by the existing subtle grid-like repetition of large white tiles throughout the station, these works invert, interpret and imagine these simple forms enlarged, shifted, mirrored or repeated – offering a subtle graphic contrast and interpretation of the space while suggesting a new option or possibility in the mundane. The work consists of seven black tiled sections that contain geometric-shaped outlines made of polished stainless-steel rods. The steel catches the light and reads as white against the black of the tile, illuminating the shapes within.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: uOttawa (995 metres)
  • Following Station: Parliament (725 metres)
  • Platform Depth: 26.5 metres below ground (Deepest)

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 566,000
  • Weekday Average: 21,400
  • Weekend Average: 12,900

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. 

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uOttawa

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uOttawa Station is located at the University of Ottawa campus, in downtown Ottawa, parallel with Nicholas Street. This station also offers a connection to the Rideau Canal via its multi-use pathway that crosses underneath the O-Train guideway. The station also serves the residents of the Sandy Hill community nearby.

uOttawa Station is located about 300 metres south of the eastern portal of the downtown tunnel. It is interesting to note that original plans called for this station to be located underground, however, it was later determined that this was not needed and an above-ground station would facilitate better access.

The station has two entrances. The main entrance is located below in the multi-use pathway tunnel, and grants access to both the eastbound and westbound platforms. The second entrance is located at ground level and gives direct access to the westbound platform.

The station makes use of side platforms, with its main entrance located underneath. Elevators and stairs give access to the platforms above.

This station is very popular for students attending the University of Ottawa, and also facilitates access between its Lees campus, located one-stop eastbound on the Confederation Line. In the winter, uOttawa Station allows access to the Rideau Canal Skateway, the world's largest skating rink, as well as some attractions of Winterlude.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The uOttawa Station is undoubtedly the best point from which to access the downtown portions of the Rideau Canal, whether to walk, run, cycle or skate due to its proximity being only a dozen or so metres away.

The artwork on display in the multi-use pathway tunnel near the main entrance is very eye-catching. Nameless portraits look at passengers and people passing by, moving and rotating as you pass by. This makes for a somewhat interactive art display and experience when in the tunnel.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: Train of Thought

Artist: Derek Michael Besant (Calgary, AB)

The artist explains his non-integrated piece this way: "There is an interesting phenomenon that happens between people when brief glances take place as you walk by strangers. Sometimes a person is deep in thought, or on their phone, but a micro expression will be exchanged... That fleeting body language is something that happens unconsciously and yet it lies at the very base of our human connection with one another. The concourse corridor at uOttawa Station is the pedestrian tunnel where people pass each other all day long. My concept is to introduce an artwork that echoes the fleeting encounters we have with one another by situating 37 large-scale portraits based on cross-sections of people who frequent the university environment. These portraits will be purposefully taken out of focus so they "remind" us of people we might know but who remain elusive. Each face will contain a single word in either French or English that floats up between the artwork and the viewer. These words will be directed towards the viewer as potential reflections of the things going on in their individual lives, and so might resonate within their private thought patterns as they walk through the concourse.

The faces in the black and white portraits will also appear to change their gaze, following the viewer at the same pace in which they are walking through the tunnel. This will create a flow/momentum between the portraits and the people, like a conversation.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

Title: Sphere Field

Artist: Kenneth Emig (Ottawa, ON)

Sphere Field is a 2-meter cube of mirror and glass containing lights and a reflective sphere forming a sculptural observatory. While the spaces of the University of Ottawa and the uOttawa Station surrounding the artwork will change with time and season, Sphere Field will reflect that change while remaining unchanged itself.

Sphere Field is part of an ongoing series of light boxes and reflective objects borne out of my curiosity, habits and history. As people move through the station, often several times a day, the sculpture provides opportunities for engagement and reflection.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Lees (900 metres)
  • Following Station: Rideau (995 metres)

 STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 384,000
  • Weekday Average: 16,300
  • Weekend Average: 4,700

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations.

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Lees

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Lees Station is located between the Lees Avenue overpass and Highway 417. The University of Ottawa's Lees campus is also situated directly across the street from the station. The station provides an important link between the University of Ottawa's two campuses, by serving as a shuttle for students between both Lees Station and uOttawa station. Several large high-density apartment complexes are also located within minutes of the station.

This station contains only one entrance off Lees Avenue. Lees Station offers the opportunity to view train movements and activity, either from within the station or from the outside as the approaches from Hurdman and uOttawa Stations are easily visible. In addition, a multi-use pathway runs along the side of the station and connects uOttawa to Hurdman and beyond, giving yet another way to observe the trains in action at different points. 

The station's artwork is also easily visible inside and outside of the station, with several features mounted on the walls of the pathway.

The layout of the station is that of side platforms, covered by glass canopies, which feature layered patterns on the glass. A small plaza area is located outside the station entrance, complete with benches and seating. Overall, an unassuming station that surprises with how well it integrates into its community and neighbourhood.

UNIQUE FEATURES

One of the most unique features of Lees is its location and vantage points granted as a result. Being able to see train movements and activity in several different ways, from along the multi-use pathway, to the station itself, to the Lees Avenue overpass, and the nearby Hurdman bridge that crosses the Rideau River, Lees Station has an extensive variety of observation points all located within minutes of the station entrance, sure to satisfy the most demanding O-Train enthusiast.

The station's artwork is also very well integrated into the station. For example, the layered patterns on the glass panels that enclose the platform area blend in with the natural vegetation and green that surrounds the station.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: Transparent Passage

Artist: Amy Thompson (Ottawa, ON)

Transparent Passage consists of layered patterns on glass and sculptural elements of a bird in flight. These line the westbound multi-use pathway and are within view of the eastbound platform.

We begin this narrative with the Rideau River, its current carving and winding its way through the landscape. Animals created paths alongside the river, then groups of humans followed, hunting and gathering, then building and industrializing. Invisible trails are marked in the sky by birds, while history is quietly recorded through more tangible signs, such as the oxidization of metal and the rings expanding within the trunk of a tree. These traces form a compendium, but instead of following a linear narrative, a more natural, dynamic tale of the area is told, where the layers of history and meaning both overlap and are built one on top of another.

By using symbols from various time periods pertinent to the area, along with a natural colour palette that represents the passing of time, Transparent Passage captures both the tangible and intangible layers of history and gives a simultaneous sense of our place within this journey.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Hurdman (705 metres)
  • Following Station: uOttawa (900 metres)

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 108,000
  • Weekday Average: 4,300
  • Weekend Average: 2,000

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. 

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Hurdman

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Hurdman Station is one of the three major transfer stations along the Confederation Line, located near Riverside Drive and Industrial Avenue. Making the important connection with the southeast Transitway, this station features an expansive bus loop, designed to accommodate the high level of bus traffic and passengers arriving and departing the station. There are also several high-density apartments and condo buildings within proximity.

A multi-use pathway runs alongside the station and reaches as far as uOttawa Station and out towards Tremblay and beyond in the east. From this pathway, it is possible to see train movements to and from the station. This is of particular interest as Hurdman Station's Confederation Line guideway and platforms are elevated from ground level, allowing the opportunity to view the trains from a different perspective and viewpoint not easily seen elsewhere along the alignment.

The station offers one entrance, located in the main station building, offering easy access to the station, the nearby residential towers and the multi-use pathway. After passing through the fare gates, the entirety of the station is within the fare-paid zone, meaning transfers to and from buses do not require tapping a Presto card. The bus platforms run the length of the station, with a bus lay-up area located just across. Hurdman Station also features a kiss & ride drop-off zone, allowing cars and taxis an easy way to approach the station to drop off or pick up passengers.

Hurdman Station also contains an expansive plaza at the rear of the station building, with benches and seating, with the nearby natural vegetation and green space as a background. 

This station is one of four stations to feature a retail outlet, with Happy Goat Coffee shop taking up residence on the lower concourse.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The elevated nature of the station is one of its most unique and defining features. From the train platforms, you can see off into the distance and down to the bus loop below. The platforms are very open with plenty of glass enclosing them, offering an abundance of natural light and scenery to help pass the short time between trains.

While Hurdman is one of three main transfer stations to the bus network, it is the only one that is in its final and permanent configuration, as both Blair and Tunney's Pasture are temporary arrangements until the Stage 2 extensions open.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: Coordinated Movement

Artist: Jill Anholt (Vancouver, BC)

This unique painted metal structure is suspended from the station walls, mimicking the flight patterns of birds.

Coordinated Movement is inspired by the location of the Hurdman Station which sits at the edge of the Ottawa River, marking a threshold between the natural world and the man-made one. This unique site marks both a node along the Atlantic Flyway, one of North America's most significant stops for migrating waterfowl, as well as one of Ottawa's most important hubs for multimodal transportation.

The work investigates the relationship between bird migration and human commuting through an exploration of the choreography of dynamic movement systems. Referencing maps, aerial photographs, diagrams of transportation infrastructure, avian flying routes and flock formations, Coordinated Movement explores the relationship between the ephemeral and the physical, the natural and the infrastructural, whilst questioning the inter-relationship between individuals and species.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Tremblay (945 metres)
  • Following Station: Lees (705 metres)

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 398,000
  • Weekday Average: 16,700
  • Weekend Average: 5,200

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. It is important to note that the figures above for Hurdman Station will also capture customers who are using the station to access bus service.

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Tremblay

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Tremblay Station is located directly next to the VIA Rail Ottawa station. In addition to providing access to the VIA Rail station, it also serves Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton Park (Baseball Stadium), the Hampton Inn and Marriot Courtyard hotels via the Max Keeping pedestrian bridge that crosses over Highway 417, as well as to other nearby destinations.
Tremblay Station offers one entrance, and a side platform layout. The entrance is oriented towards the VIA Rail station and features an overhead canopy to help shield passengers from the natural elements. This canopy is the main art installation and features mirrored stainless steel cutouts of the different provincial and territorial flowers that hang and sway with the wind, which also allow sunlight to pass through from above. It is definitely worth seeing in person as the effect and uniqueness cannot be replicated in the photo. Surrounding this area is a public plaza, complete with benches and seating.

From the large open concourse, stairs and dual elevator banks provide access to the platform level below. The first half of the platform is contained within the station building, while the far end extends beyond and is surrounded by glass curtain walls, providing views of the surrounding natural vegetation and green spaces, especially along the far end of the westbound platform.

Overall, Tremblay Station is a station with a relatively simple design that offers large open and airy spaces, great viewpoints of the track and beyond, and calming scenery outside the station walls. With stunning artwork outside along the pathway to the entrance and an abundance of natural light inside, Tremblay is a standout example of the design and execution of making a public transit facility a welcoming place.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The stunning artwork at this station is among the best along the Confederation Line. The intricacy and detail achieved demonstrate plenty of imagination in its design. It truly must be seen in person to be appreciated. The open spaces, airy feeling and soaring rooflines of the station combine perfectly to create an inviting environment to catch the train. As this station is one of the first places people arriving in Ottawa by VIA Rail will visit, it is a perfect setting, both visually and in design to fulfill this important role of welcoming visitors and tourists in addition to residents returning home.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: National Garden
Artist: Jyhling Lee (Toronto, ON)

National Garden is an imaginary landscape composed of the official flowers from each Canadian province, territory and the City of Ottawa. Situated alongside the VIA Rail Station, the sculptural plaza canopy recognizes the faraway destinations that can be reached by train and acknowledges the distant places that travellers may have come from. The flowers are mementos from abroad. National Garden celebrates both the romance of travel and recognizes, through the depiction of vernacular flowers, the unique and delicate qualities of Canadian culture and the physical landscape.

Mirrored finish stainless steel panels will be integrated onto the underside of the glass canopy over the pedestrian walkway towards the station from the VIA Rail Station. The panels will have cut-outs with fold-over pieces depicting various silhouettes of provincial and territorial flowers, and Ottawa's municipal flower.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: St-Laurent (1300 metres)
  • Following Station: Hurdman (945 metres)

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 24,000
  • Weekday Average: 900
  • Weekend Average: 600

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. 

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St-Laurent

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St-Laurent Station is located underground adjacent to the St. Laurent Shopping Centre. This station, much like it was in the past as a bus Transitway station, is a multi-level station, with the train platforms and concourse located underground, and the bus loop situated above.

This station primarily serves the St. Laurent Shopping Centre as well as serves as an important hub for commuters reaching businesses on St. Laurent Boulevard and as well as the many residential areas nearby. It is interesting to note that St-Laurent station is OC Transpo's original and first underground transit station.

As mentioned above, the train is located underground, with access provided by the above-ground station building, as well as through the indoor connection to the shopping mall. Additional access is provided by a pedestrian pathway that starts just behind the eastbound track's far end and exits at Tremblay Road, granting easy access to residents of Eastway Gardens to the station.

Large expansive and immersive murals decorate and add colour and ambience to the station's platform level. In such an open and vast space, these murals definitely add much-needed colour and warmth to the station.

The station's layout is that of side platforms. Interestingly, the two platforms are not connected directly and require passing through the fare gates to switch from one platform to the other. An overhead walkway (still located in the underground station cavern, and a hold-over from its former vocation as a bus Transitway station) allows access between both platform entrances.

St-Laurent Station is overall a good station but does suffer from some design limitations as the bus loop located above needed to be maintained open and functional during construction and conversion from bus to rail transit. As a complete rethinking and redesign would have surely affected the bus operations above, engineers and designers did their best to improve the station. The biggest drawbacks are the narrow accesses to the stairs and escalators from the concourse walkway level, the 2 small elevators that reach the bus platform, and the massive ceiling that comes off a bit as unfinished. These points can be easily looked past, but it does remain unfortunate that they exist.

UNIQUE FEATURES

St-Laurent Station is unique in that it is currently the only station outside of the downtown core to be located underground, much as it was in the past as a bus Transitway station. As mentioned earlier, it is the original and first underground transit station on OC Transpo's network, originally built in 1987.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: Untitled

Artist: Andrew Morrow (Chelsea, QC)

Three large, immersive murals painted by the artist depict re-imagined Canadian histories. Two of the murals are located on the westbound platform, while the third is a corner-split mural on the eastbound platform.

Andrew Morrow is a contemporary Canadian painter whose work is characterized by a restless desire to both inhabit and extend historical, narrative painting. Working from personal, actual, and invented histories, Morrow's paintings engage broad historical themes such as war, eroticism, beauty, the apocalypse, and death, complicating these through a resistance to narrative closure and spatial coherence.

In his murals for the St-Laurent Station, Morrow combines large-scale digital printing technology with physical painting to produce three site-specific and archival murals. Drawing on formal conventions from Western history painting and early Canadian photographic and narrative history, the murals reflect an uncertain, fragmented negotiation of both Canadian history and history painting itself. Populated by figures at work and at rest, these dreamlike paintings present a complex and shifting Canadian landscape, where the gravity of addressing a painted National history is balanced by individual moments of beauty and connection.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Cyrville (850 metres)
  • Following Station: Tremblay (1300 metres)

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 221,000
  • Weekday Average: 8,700
  • Weekend Average: 4,400

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. 

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Cyrville

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Cyrville Station is located underneath Cyrville Road, just north of Highway 417. Cyrville Station is well positioned to encourage growth and development in this region over the coming years with more residential developments as well as commercial and office space planned.

The station layout features a centre platform, allowing easy access to both directions of travel on the Confederation Line. There are two entrances, located on both sides of Cyrville Road. The main entrance is located on the eastern side of Cyrville Road and features fare gates and an entrance concourse. The second entrance, situated directly across the street, is much smaller and as a result only contains stairs and an elevator, with the fare gates located below at platform level.

A multi-use pathway is located along the station length, with convenient access stairs to the left of the main station entrance.

The sheer size of the station can be observed from Cyrville Road as you can easily see the entire station's platforms unimpeded. The platform is wide and open, flanked by natural vegetation and green on both sides. The station's art piece is called "Stand of Birch", and is 13 stainless steel birch trees, placed at the far northern end of the station platform. All these elements combine to create a rare space of calmness in the city and the transit network.

Cyrville Station is at first glance a simple station but look a little deeper and you will find it stands out in form, design and landscape.

UNIQUE FEATURES

Cyrville Station is one of several perfect places to observe train movements from within the station and above from Cyrville Road. The two sides of the platform are easily seen and viewed. With plenty of sweeping lines in the architecture, and the many vantage points available, there is no end of possibilities for train spotting and photography.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: Stand of Birch

Artist: Don Maynard (Kingston, ON)

Thirteen slender stainless steel birch trees, measuring 7.3 metres tall, are located on the north end of the Cyrville Station platform surrounded by prairie grasses.

"For thousands of years, indigenous peoples have used the bark from birch trees to build their canoes. They travelled on the Gatineau, Rideau and Ottawa rivers to trade, hunt and meet with family and friends. Things have not changed much.

Stand of Birch is a grouping of 13 slender birch trees at the end of a long winding river of grasses; in the canopy, branches intertwine and connect. Stand of Birch references the coming-together of the people of Ottawa as they travel across the city – linked together by its 13 Light Rail Transit stations."

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Previous Station: Blair (1615 metres)
  • Following Station: St-Laurent (850 metres)

STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)

  • Balanced Boardings: 18,000
  • Weekday Average: 700
  • Weekend Average: 300

Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. 

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Blair

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Blair Station is the current eastern terminus for the Confederation Line, until 2024 when the line is extended to Place d'Orleans and Trim road. Blair Station is also one of three main bus transfer stations on the Confederation Line, this station specifically serving those with itineraries continuing east to Orleans.

Popular destinations for Blair Station include the Gloucester Centre, Cineplex Theatres, several office complexes, as well as the headquarters for CSIS and CSE located within walking distance.

Blair Station has several entrances. The first is via the entrance near the Gloucester Centre, which gives access to local bus platforms as well as the overhead walkway. The overhead walkway runs from near the Gloucester Centre to across the 174 Highway (Queensway), to Telesat Court, and has an entrance to the train station and the bus routes towards Orleans. A third entrance is from the fare paid zone bus platform, leading directly underneath and up to the train platforms.

This station has a centre platform layout, allowing easy access to both platforms, as trains alternate between Platform 1 and Platform 2, simplifying access somewhat as opposed to what is found at the other terminus station of Tunney's Pasture.

This station was converted from the bus rapid transit to rail and as a result is a mix and combination of the original station and the new, one of two examples of this on the Confederation Line (the other being St-Laurent). The massive bus loop and platforms handle the arriving and departing passengers via bus transit, transferring them through the fare paid zone into the station with direct access to the O-Train platforms. The end result is quite stunning and impressive. A sweeping roof line with skylight frames the station. The station's artwork "Lightscape" reflects and shimmers in the sunlight, and move and sways with the wind and passage of trains. With views of the platform from the overhead walkway and entrance, departing passengers can easily see the trains and the departures.

Blair Station will be one of four stations to feature a retail outlet, with Happy Goat Coffee shop opening on the lower concourse entrance in early 2020.

UNIQUE FEATURES

The sweeping roof and glass flags artwork combine to create a stunning visual experience in the station. While Blair Station makes use of a lot of previous elements that were retained for the new station, it does so extremely well. For example, the old enclosed walkway over the bus transitway was reused and opened up as the overhead entrance to the train station platforms.

Another unique feature is that the train platforms can be accessed from underneath via the fare paid zone bus loop, or from above via the overhead walkway and entrance.

During the night, the station lights up like a lantern, thanks in part to its glass work and open areas.

PUBLIC ARTWORK

Title: Lightscape

Artists: cj fleury and Catherine Widgery (Ottawa, ON and Montreal, QC)

Lightscape consists of thirty suspended screens; airy, binary code-like pieces that use thousands of small dichroic glass 'flags' to announce the stairwells and tracks and move in response to the air currents of the trains as they come and go.

Inspired by the sunrise, a metaphor for awakening imagination, Lightscape is informed by the proximity to Ottawa's national centres for research, science, security and observation.

Artists cj fleury and Catherine Widgery married elements of space research, mathematical order, colour and light with the movement of wind, trains and people. Thirty code-like screens, using thousands of dichroic glass rectangles, announce the stairwells and tracks. Blair Station becomes a breathing organism, where the shimmering screens respond to rushes of air from incoming trains and weather.

Ethereal, ephemeral, structured, these luminous veils of glimmering bits are animated representations of the activity and energy of this station and this city: blooms of code, evolving ideas, flows of shifting light, reflections and patterns. Readable on many levels, the art expresses a commingling of precision and chance, science and art, natural, digital, and imaginary realms.

Artwork descriptions provided by the City of Ottawa

STATION FACTS AND MAP
  • Opening Date: September 14, 2019
  • Line: Confederation Line
  • Following Station: Cyrville (1615 metres)
STATION RIDERSHIP (November 2019)
  • Balanced Boardings: 479,000
  • Weekday Average: 20,100
  • Weekend Average: 6,300
Balanced boardings are the average number of entries and exits at O-Train stations. It is important to note that the figures above for Blair Station will also capture customers who are using the station to access bus service.
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Trim (2024)

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Trim Station is an existing Transitway station that is currently located southeast of the intersection of Trim Road and OR 174. The existing station will be converted to a terminal station serving as the eastern terminus of the Confederation Line. The train platform will be in the median of OR 174 at the existing intersection of OR 174 and Trim Road. In order to locate the LRT platform at this location, Trim Road will be re-aligned to the east of the existing facility and an improved intersection will be constructed, which will have the capacity to service the expected future traffic demands.

The bus terminal and the park and ride facilities (with a capacity of over 1,100 cars) will be located south of OR 174 and east of the existing Trim Road. The station will be served by one fare-controlled entrance providing access from the park and ride area to the station. The station will be designed to allow the bus terminal to remain accessible to the public while securing the train station during non-operating hours.

There will also be a new fully enclosed, naturally ventilated, glazed bridge corridor connecting the fare paid entrance to the LRT platform.

An overview of how the Trim and 174 intersection will be shifted to the east, and the new alignment for that segment of Trim Road.
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Place d'Orléans (2024)

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Place d'Orléans Station is an existing Transitway station that is currently located adjacent to Place d'Orléans Shopping Centre and OR 174, which will be converted to serve as a transfer station. The Station will be served by four fare-controlled entrances. Two entrances will serve the station from the existing pedestrian bridge; one at each of the LRT and bus platform locations. One entrance will be provided to the LRT platform from Champlain Street and an entrance will be provided to the bus terminal from Champlain Street. A connection to the LRT Station, allowing passengers to transfer between bus service and train service without passing through fare control gates and/or revalidating fare payment will be provided from the bus platform area. The station will be designed to allow the bus terminal to remain accessible to the public while securing the train station during train non-operating hours. The existing pedestrian bridge will continue to allow for a connection from the park and ride (and points north of OR 174) and Place d'Orléans Shopping Centre without having to enter a fare gate.

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Convent Glen (2024)

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Convent Glen Station is a new station located at the crossing of OR 174 and Orléans Boulevard. The station will be served by two fare-controlled entrances located on either side of Orléans Boulevard. The platform will be located below Orléans Boulevard in the median of OR 174. Sidewalks and entry plazas will be sized to accommodate the number of pedestrians and cyclists, as required to serve the public along Orléans Boulevard, the bus stops, and the passengers transferring from bus to train.

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Jeanne d'Arc (2024)

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Jeanne d'Arc Station will be a new station located at the crossing of OR 174 and Jeanne d'Arc Boulevard. The station will be served by two fare-controlled entrances located on either side of Jeanne d'Arc Boulevard. One entrance will serve the northbound lane and one will serve the southbound lane. The platform will be located below Jeanne d'Arc Boulevard in the median of OR 174.

The station structure, vertical circulation elements, station entry and entry plaza will be designed and constructed to permit the widening of 18 Jeanne d'Arc Boulevard to an ultimate right of way width of 37.5 metres without major modification to the station elements. The location of the station entrances has been carefully coordinated with the future bridge configuration to accommodate all modes of transportation and to provide sufficient public entry space.

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Montreal (2024)

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Montréal Station will be a new station located at the crossing of OR 174 and Montreal Road. The Station will be served by two fare-controlled entrances located on Montreal Road. One entrance will serve the eastbound lane and one will serve the westbound lane.

The platform will be in the median of OR 174, above Montreal Road, and will be located so that the platform spans Montreal Road. Bus stops and shelters will be provided in each direction of travel on Montreal Road. Sidewalks and station entry plazas will be sized appropriately to serve the movement and volume of pedestrians and cyclists along Montreal Road, the bus stops, and the passengers transferring from bus to train.

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Westboro (2025)

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Westboro Station is an existing Transitway station to the north of Scott Street between Tweedsmuir Avenue and Athlone Avenue. The Transitway will be converted to accommodate LRT. The new main entrance will be located on Scott Street and an entrance on the north side of the existing Transitway trench will facilitate the non-fare paid transfer of passengers from the bus drop off area on the existing western bus access drive. From there, passengers will connect to the LRT platform below through fare gates.

Pedestrian connections linking the north and south side of the existing trench will be provided at the east and west side of the station. Bicycle parking will be provided in the Scott Street plaza area from the main entrance with passenger pick up and drop off (PPUDO) spaces provided in each direction of travel on Scott Street. North of the existing trench, and west of the station, a bus staging area to accommodate four buses will be provided.

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Kìchì Sìbì (2025)

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Kìchì Sìbì Station is an existing Transitway Station, which will be located within the existing Transitway trench between Dominion Avenue and Berkley Avenue. Bicycle parking will be provided in the station's public entrance plaza, which is designed to provide public access across the guideway linking pedestrians and cyclists from Dominion Avenue to Workman Avenue with direct connection to the NCC pathway on the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway.

The pedestrian bridge east of the station near Roosevelt Avenue will be decommissioned throughout construction. PPUDO spaces will be conveniently located near the station plaza on Dominion Avenue.

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Sherbourne (2025)

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Sherbourne Station is a new station. The single station entrance will be located within the Byron Linear Park between Cleary Avenue and Sherbourne Road. The station entrance plaza will seamlessly integrate with the planned functions of the Bryon Linear Park, activating this node within the park. Bicycle parking will be provided in the station plaza and PPDUO spaces will be provided on both the north and south side of Bryon Avenue.

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New Orchard (2025)

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New Orchard Station is a new station located within the Byron Linear Park, immediately east of New Orchard Avenue. All station facilities and system support spaces will be completely below grade except for the fare paid entrance and emergency exits. New Orchard will also be constructed as an open station and the platforms will be located below the level of the existing grade.

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Lincoln Fields (2025)

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Lincoln Fields Station is an existing Transitway Station that will be re-oriented and completely rebuilt to function as a new LRT station. The train platform will be located under Carling Avenue with a fare paid connection to the bus facility to allow passengers to transfer seamlessly without a requirement to pass through fare gates or revalidate their fare. There will be a minimum of three fare-controlled entrances: a station entrance will be provided from Carling Avenue; an entrance will provide access from the west side of the Guideway at grade; and, an entrance will be provided at the bus loop. The existing bus terminal will be reconfigured to accommodate bus platforms and bus layby facilities only, and a new bus drivers' facility. The PPUDO spaces currently located within the operating area of the bus terminal will be relocated and segregated from the fare paid zone with access from Carling Avenue, shared with buses as currently configured.

This major transfer station will be outfitted with public washrooms available to fare paid customers during LRT operation hours and will have provisions for a future retail space. A signalized pedestrian crossing will also be provided to facilitate improved station access across Carling Avenue.

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Queensview (2025)

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Queensview Station is a new station located to the north of Highway 417. The station is to be served by a minimum of one fare-controlled entrance and will be integrated with a new public access pedestrian bridge spanning Highway 417 and landing at Baxter Road, providing a significant new connection for communities north and south of the highway.

There will be a north entrance building and entry plaza with access from the enhanced MUP and sidewalk system to allow access from the Queensview Drive and Queensway Terrace North communities. This entrance will also serve the new pedestrian bridge spanning Highway 417.

The station and bridge will be accessed via a combination of a sloped pathway, stairs and elevators on the north side of Highway 417 and by accessible vertical circulation elements from Baxter Road on the south side of Highway 417. The public sidewalk will be extended along Baxter Road to the pedestrian bridge access point. Bicycle parking spaces will be provided conveniently at grade near both station access points, as well PPUDO spaces will be provided on Baxter Road and Queensview Drive.

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Pinecrest (2025)

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Pinecrest Station is an existing Transitway Station that will shift south to align with the Confederation Line West alignment. The new Pinecrest Station will be located on the north side of Highway 417 west of Pinecrest Road.

Off-street bus facilities will be constructed to support the transfer of customers from bus stops located adjacent to the station. There will be a bi-directional route from Pinecrest Road to the station's bus stop location and a bus turnaround after the bus stop to return buses to Pinecrest Road. The transfer of customers at this station will not be within a fare paid zone. The station will be connected to Pinecrest Road and Dumaurier Avenue by MUPs, with PPUDO spaces located on Dumaurier Avenue with convenient access to the station plaza and bicycle parking in the station plaza area.

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